Proof positive of snow on the ground in 50 states

Back in February after a major snowstorm in the South that produced  a snow cover in northern Florida there was a bit of a controversy of whether snow was on the ground in portions of all 50 states. The wildcard was of course Hawaii, a state that does get snow in the high elevations on Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea but it does not last for an extended time. The original verdict was that there was no snow in Hawaii so there was snow cover in 49 out of the 50 states, still a significant statistic. However later information showed there were small patches of lingering snowfall near the  Keck  and Subaru observatories on summit of Mauna Kea on the Big Island.

Thanks to Righ Pregmon of Crest Hill for passing along this photo proving the remnants of snow on the Big Island.

   

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Another powerhouse storm slams the Northeast

High winds and flooding have left portions of the Northeastern United States looking like a disaster area.  In fact a State of Emergency has been declared in New Jersey. 

For more on the storm, including photos, follow the link below to the WGN Severe Weather Blog.

http://weblogs.wgntv.com/chicago-weather/severe-weather/

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Photo courtesy of Tribune affiliate WPIX in New York 

No hype- another storm slams the Northeast

Another in a series of monster storms slammed the Northeastern United States over the weekend.   Up to 6 inches of rain has fallen from this storm resulting in flooding, and winds over 70mph toppled trees and power lines.  

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has declared a state of emergency, allowing New Jersey to utilize National Guard troops and order evacuations.  Up to 100,000 customers are still without power this morning in New Jersey alone, down from 235,000 on Sunday. 

Below:  Scenes of damage and flooding from New York and New Jersey

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Photos courtesy of Tribune affiliate WPIX in New York
 

Week ahead could bring city both 60s and snow

Chicago’s March weather is known for its volatility and rapid temperature changes. Its temperature extremes span 100 degrees, the greatest of any month — ranging from an all-time 88-degree high on March 29, 1986, to a low of minus 12 on March 4, 1873. The early part of the upcoming week will feature seasonably mild weather with highs reaching the lower 50s away from Lake Michigan, but persistent north to northeast winds will keep a prevailing chill in the city and lakeside areas where temperatures will remain in the 40s. A surge of warmer air will sweep readings into the 60s by Thursday and Friday ahead of a potent spring storm expected to spread showers and thunderstorms into the area by early Saturday.

Snowless March in peril

So far this March has been one of the few to reach the “ides” without at least an official trace of snow on the books — and with mild weather through the week no snow is expected at least through Saturday. A sharp influx of cold air Saturday night and Sunday interacting with low pressure moving north through Indiana could not only bring Chicago its first flakes of the month, but also some accumulating snow if current forecasts play out.

Closest distance between U.S. temperature extremes

Dear Tom,
The nation’s lowest and highest temperatures on March 7 were in Angel Fire, N.M., and Fort Stockton, Texas–only 422 miles apart. Historically, what is the shortest distance between the daily national high and low temperature locales?

Dave Mesich, Streamwood

Dear Dave,
Because temperatures usually decline by 5.4 degrees for every 1,000 feet of vertical ascent, elevation is the key to an answer. Locations near to each other but at greatly different elevations are the likely candidates.

Steven Dutch, Professor of Geology at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, has painstakingly documented the nation’s daily temperature extremes since 1995. His results indicate that Truckee (elevation 5,840 feet) and Death Valley (190 feet below sea level), both in California and 264 miles apart, occasionally register the nation’s lowest and highest temperatures, respectively, on the same day.