Latest fall weather photos

Frost on the ground in Hoffman Estates Photo courtesy Robert Shaw, Hoffman Estates, IL

Frost on the ground in Hoffman Estates
Photo courtesy Robert Shaw, Hoffman Estates, IL

Fall colors near Rohrssen Road in Hoffman Estates, IL Photo courtesy of Robert Shaw, Hoffman Estates, IL

Fall colors near Rohrssen Road in Hoffman Estates, IL
Photo courtesy of Robert Shaw, Hoffman Estates, IL

 

Fall colors in Starved Rock. Photo courtesy of Joy Kinney, Starved Rock, IL

Fall colors in Starved Rock.
Photo courtesy of Joy Kinney, Starved Rock, IL

At Morton Arboretum in Lisle--fall colors! Photo courtesy of Joy Kinney, Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL

At Morton Arboretum in Lisle–fall colors!
Photo courtesy of Joy Kinney, Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL

Check out the hues of red and orange in these fall colors in Plainfield taken near the Lake Renwick Bird Sanctuary Photo courtesy of Linda Kloster, Plainfield, IL

Check out the hues of red and orange in these fall colors in Plainfield taken near the Lake Renwick Bird Sanctuary
Photo courtesy of Linda Kloster, Plainfield, IL

 

From Chicago Botanic Garden--this extraordinary shot courtesy of Mike Zarnek. Photo courtesy of Mike Zarnek, Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe, IL

From Chicago Botanic Garden–this extraordinary shot courtesy of Mike Zarnek.
Photo courtesy of Mike Zarnek, Chicago Botanic Garden, Glencoe, IL

 

Oct. 12: Snowy 2006 vs. summery 2008


Two years ago today the Chicago area was hit by the earliest measurable snow in its
history. Officially 0.3 inches of snow fell at O’Hare Airport, but many suburban areas
received more than an inch of snow on a day that saw a high of 39 and a low of 30.
Click here for Tom Skilling’s full report and weather photos from Oct. 12, 2006
In contrast, today the city is basking in summerlike warmth with temperatures topping
the 80-degree mark.
–By Steve Kahn, WGN Weather Center Meteorologist


7.5 HOUR SNOW EVENT ENDS
The snow has ended across the Chicago area after bringing most of the city a 2-4″ snowfall in just a little under 8 hours. The snow began around 8 a.m. this morning and had ended by about 3:30 p.m. Many locations in the southern portions of the metropolitan area experienced a rain/snow mix or a period of rain at the tail end of the storm. Heavier amounts of snow in the 3-5″ range fell northwest of the city towards Rockford.
Some area snowfall totals
Mundelein 4.3″
Arlington Heights 2.9″
Midway Airport 2.4″
Downers Grove 2.4″
Oak Brook 2.4″
O’Hare 2.2″ (official city total)

Snow to end this afternoon


SNOW TO END THIS AFTERNOON AFTER 2-LOCALLY 6 INCH TOTALS
The snow arrived right on schedule this morning, beginning across the area around 8 a.m. Just before 1 p.m. a little over two inches had accumulated at Arlington Heights while Frank Wachowski, the Midway observer reported 1.9″. The storm is moving out of the area at a fairly rapid pace and it appears that the snow will be ending during the afternoon. The storm’s fast departure will limit total snow accumulations putting final amounts in the 2-5″ range. The snow has been a bit heavier to the north and west where 3- 4 inches have already accumulated in the Rockford area and a few locations far northwest of the city may wind up with 6 inches.


DECEMBER’S SECOND MAJOR SNOWSTORM PACKS A WALLOP
The weekend snowstorm is almost history. Skies have cleared from the Chicago area west while the last vestiges of lake-effect snow are exiting Porter County in northwest Indiana. The early stages of the storm arrived in waves beginning pre-dawn Saturday. The storm really got it’s snow-act together Saturday evening as the low pressure system began to intensify as it moved up the Ohio Valley from western Kentucky to central Ohio.
At Midway, weather observer Frank Wachowski reported that snow fell at the rate of one inch per hour for eight consecutive hours beginning Saturday evening between 7-8 p.m. until 3 a.m. Sunday. The snow then began to taper off and ended there around 7 a.m. Frank’s snowfall totaled 10.1 inches. This storm, the area’s second major snow system this month, produced more snow than 3-8″ totals the December 4-5 storm did.
At Arlington Heights snowfall was about 5 inches. The new snow lies atop an ice-crusted 4 inch
residual snowpack making the total snow depth here around 9 inches.
While the Chicago area is digging out, this storm is now spreading its arsenal of heavy snow and ice to the northeast where areas from the lower Great Lakes to New England are expecting more than a foot of snow. South of the heavy snow, the precipitation will transition to ice and then to rain.
Steve Kahn WGN Weather Center Meteorologist

Clipped by the Clipper


Well, the Alberta Clipper really did a number in the Arlington Heights area. Snowfall as of 6 a.m. this morning totaled 7 inches. The snow began Tuesday afternoon around 3 p.m. but was quite light until about 6 p.m. By mid evening 2.5″ had fallen, but it was still snowing steadily and the snow continued overnight, obviously picking up in intensity. Only a few flurries are falling at 7:40 a.m. but radar indicates that some lake effect could move in later this morning.

Forecasting Winter Precipitation Types


A GUIDE TO FORECASTING AND UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF WINTER PRECIPITATION
Today’s winter storm brought a variety of winter precipitation to the Chicago area with snow, sleet and freezing rain all occurring. Tonight as surface temperatures rise above 32º, rain will fall. This graphic that originally appeared on the Chicago Tribune weather page on January 3, 2005 helps explain what kind of vertical temperature profile in the lower 2 miles of the atmosphere is needed to produce the various types of winter precipitation.
FORECASTING_PRECIP_TYPES.jpg